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Saturday
Jan192013

Discard/Reclaim: Nina Huryn & Terry Klausman, February 16th 2013

Discard/Reclaim

New work by Nina Huryn and Terry Klausman

Opening Reception: Saturday, February 16th, 3-7pm

Nina Huryn, Mixed Media Constructions 

Terry Klausman, Found Object Assemblages

Nina Huryn and Terry Klausman share a skill at noticing the discarded things around us and using these as elements in their affecting found object assemblages.

Nina Huryn has a remarkable story-telling ability that is immediately apparent in her work.  She adds panels of tooled and painted leather with imagery that sometimes subtly, sometimes overtly tells a story or portrays a modern interpretation of a morality tale.  These panels are not unlike the cells in a comic book or graphic novel or even the hieroglyphic panels in Egyptian tombs.  Information provided by cast-off fragments of candy wrappers, machinery or unidentifiable parts is woven into a narrative with her skeletal figures acting out a part in a scene in a play.
Huryn's skeletal figures owe much to the Gothic and early Renaissance artists; Jan Van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Durer. These skeletal characters are not simple representations of ancestors but represent the internal and external conflicts that are often at odds within us and around us.
 
Terry Klausman is a trained welder and self-taught artist whose creative curiosity and drive led him to sculpture and fine art.  His early metal sculpture made use of machinery cast-offs and his welding know-how to create complex sculptural pieces that are machine-age icons or effigies.
Klausman found a similar, softer, but no less original voice in found-object centered collage and sculpture.  Replacing the industrial machine parts were household tools, furniture and outdated electronics.  Instead of steel it is wood that forms the backbone and surface to these sculptures, but like the rust and patina of metal it is the faded surface or peeling paint of these wooden elements that adds the depth of time and with it character. That these disparate, discarded elements, meticulously fitted together, appear complete and whole is a testament to Klausman’s craftsmanship, patience and imagination.  That the sculptures reveal much yet remain mysterious after repeated observation is a statement of Klausman’s unique vision and creative spirit. An Akron native, this is Terry Klausman's first  Cleveland area gallery exhibit.


Exhibit runs through Saturday, April 6, 2013