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Bonnie Gordon

Artist Statement

"I was a fine arts student at Ohio University from 1965 to 1968. Although my focus while in school was on painting, the ceramics classes I took as electives intrigued me. In 1972, I decided to put a ceramics studio in the basement of my house and began making pottery. Forty-nine years later I continue to work in clay as a means of expression. The stoneware forms I made in 1972 were very traditional and utilitarian. As time went on, I began layering appliqued floral and organic shapes made of clay on top of those simple forms. I also experimented with stretching and altering the simple thrown forms, creating pieces that were more sculptural.
In the mid 1980’s, I began experimenting with porcelain clay bodies about the same time as the forms were becoming more sensual and organic. My intent was to create pure white forms, keeping them simple and sculptural, but my painting background got in the way. The white
surface was like a canvas begging for color. I could not resist temptation and it was not long before I began applying colorful underglazes, glazes and stains to those white surfaces.
While much in my work has changed throughout the years, the important elements that have remained are those which represent my great loves in life – music, dance and nature. More
colorful symbolic imagery has been incorporated into these pieces as my own life has been altered again and again. These life changes have taken me to unexplored places in my soul, places rich with spirit, love, death, loss and growth. Nature, the seasons and growth somehow
mimic this continual dance of life. It is a dance of many colors.
Specifically, themed series take anywhere from six months to 3 years to complete. As with one’s life, many of these series overlap and merge together at varying times. My forms represent the essence of life with the incised lines representing the rhythms of nature and the
soul.
My intention is to create an honest ceramic form, complete in both design and concept.

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